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20121104
20121104
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
sitting in this auditorium, those in overflow rooms, those who are listening to us or watching us in various media and who will intersect us on the internet sometime in the next days and weeks. i'm jane harman, president and ceo of the wilson center. and as some of you know, we recently joined forces with npr to create this year-long public event series that we call the national conversation. npr's president and ceo, my california buddy gary knell who has a muppet, which is an improvement on himself, named after him for his roles, his role before on running sesame street is sitting in the front row, as is joe gildenhorn, ambassador joe gildenhorn who is the chairman of the wilson center board of trustees. and i'd like to welcome many other friends here today. my hope is that this series will provide the public, that is you, with new opportunities to engage in much-needed civil discourse free from spin, imagine that in this election season, in the safe political space that the wilson center provides. for today's event, the wilson center and npr, partnered with the chicago council o
. why they're on high alert and igniting controversy. >>> st. michael is among us, and he lives in bellmawr, new jersey. one man's quest to restore his community after sandy's devastation. >>> good morning. i'm randi kaye. it is 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. in los angeles. thanks for starting your morning with us. >>> well, it is the final stretch, quite literally. already just two days now left medical election day. millions of you have already voted, but the candidates are doing everything they can over these precious last couple of days to reach the rest of you. trying to get the voters energized and excited about the prospects for the next four years. we have our correspondents spread out throughout the battleground states to bring you the latest on the election and the final push. we start in new hampshire. that's where president obama is making his first campaign stop in just a couple of hours before heading to florida, ohio, and colorado. joining him on the trail again today is former president bill clinton. our white house correspondent dan lothian is live in new ha
. >> this is a path to take us down to total socialism and totalitarianism. >> the president seemed to play the role of professor in chief. >> he seems to lack that emotional bit when he's talking about the politics. he's very wonkish which surprises people because on the campaign trail, he seemed to be a different person. >> in a final blow, a crucial democratic seat passed into republican hands. >> ted kennedy's leaving the u.s. senate, which he had occupied for 46 years until his dealt last year has been won by a republican. >> the president had lost the votes he needed to pass health care reform. his staff told him to scale back the bill or pause and return to it later. >> one of his senior advisers said to him, you know, mr. president, unless you're feeling lucky, i just don't think this is going to happen. >> i was making a joke to him. i said, look, my name is barack obama and i live in the oval office so i've got to be lucky. we felt although we knew it was going to be difficult to try to get it done. >> by all accounts when politics had seemed lost -- >> it is the right thing to do and that
perspective. we've assembled experts from europe, middle east, and asia to tell us how the rest of the world sees this election. then i have a panel of distinguished historians, walter isa isaacson, sean wilentz and edmund morris to look at an eye to the past. what do past campaigns and past presidents tell us about this nail-biter? also americans might be anxious to learn tuesday's results of the chinese are even more anxious, perhaps, to learn who their new leaders will be, why they might have more at stake than we do. but first here's my take. whoever wins the election on tuesday, on wednesday either barack obama or mitt romney will have to start worrying about the same urgent challenge, how to stop the united states from falling over the fiscal cliff. this is, of course, the second cliff hanger that the united states has faced in two years, the first being the debt ceiling debacle. how did the world's greatest democracy start functioning so badly? maybe the next president can try to fix this broader problem. but first the fiscal cliff. unless congress act, the spending cuts and tack incr
with the other states. bob mcdonnell is a good friend of mine in virginia. he was with us yesterday. by the way, he is also philadelphia born. we are competing with him. i am competing with john kasich in ohio. i do not know if you watched the event in ohio on friday night. they had a big crowd. oh my goodness, look how big that crowd is. [cheers and applause] you have a lot to be proud of. take your pictures. if you have seen governor romney's plan, it has five points. they are all important. i will tell you the one that i think can really help us in the world. i will skip it because i just got it. [cheers and applause] we are on the way. i just saw the bus go by. when i do, i want them to hear you in philadelphia and trenton from here. [cheers and applause] i want them to hear you in new york city. [cheers and applause] i want them to hear you in washington, d.c. can you do that? we will be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> you hurt governor tom corbett. the bus has arrived. -- you heard governor tom corbett. we will take your calls. a democratic column. go ahead, carl. caller: i am concerned about
. >> this is a vehicle to take us down a path of total socialism and totalitarianism. >> when it came to explaining health care, the president seemed to play the role of professor in chief. >> he seems to lack that emotional bit when he's talking about the politics. >> in a final blow, a crucial democratic seat passed into republican hands. >> ted kennedy's seat in the u.s. senate, which he had occupied for 46 years until his death last year, has been won by a republican. >> the president had lost the votes he needed to pass health care reform. his staff told him to scale back the bill or pause and return to it later. >> one of his senior advisers said to him, you know, mr. president, unless you're feeling lucky, i just don't think this is going to happen. >> i was making a yoke to them, i said, look, my name's barack obama and i'm not oval office, i've got to be lucky. you know, i felt that we still had an opportunity. although it was going to be more difficult, to try to get it done. >> by all accounts, when the politics seemed lost -- >> it is the right thing to do and that's why i'm fighting so
on us to be there every step of the way. >>> mitt romney ended his day yesterday in colorado at the rally in englewood. he had an admission about day one of a romney presidency. >> when i'm elected, the economy and american jobs will still be stagnant, of course, but i won't waste any time complaining about my predecessor. from day one i'm going to go to work to help americans get back to work. >> another big named endorsement for the president. he's now got the support of israel's oldest newspaper. they say obama is good for israel. quote, the outcome of the elections will be determined by the voter's decision as to which of the two candidates are better for america. but if any of them are vacillating whether hob has been a good president for israel, the answer is question. kind words by a big paper but the endorsement is expected to have little effect on the voters here. >> the u.s. >>> and in president obama's sprint to head a toss-up uks he made a stop in wisconsin where he urged supporters to stick with him even if they sometimes have a difference of opinion. >> you may
keating joins us from tampa, and the numbers. it was crazy yesterday, phil. >> absolutely, reportedly six hour waits at certain locations in miami-dade county outside of the precinct on friday, three and a half hours all day long to stand in line, shuffle forward and finally cost their ballot. the numbers are big despite the fact in 2008 there was early voting on this sunday before election day, this year, there is not. and that's been a point of convention, democrats and democrat leaning groups have called that voting suppression engineered by the republican dominated legislature and governor's office in the state of florida. however, despite those cries, the numbers have been as good as they were back in 2008. take a look at numbers right now. nearly 4 million, this is through friday, nearly 4 million floridians voted early, by early voting or absentee ballot. and the way it breaks down, the most early voters stand in line and cast their ballot, 45% of those people are registered democrats, 36 are registered republicans so clearly democrats have the edge there on early voting, but when
and her family, and she will do great things. we also have york for more -- former gov. with us. give him a big round of applause. if you're an outstanding senator for the next six years, bill nelson. [applause] korean brown and the chairwoman of the democratic party, debbie wasserman shelves are all here. let's hear it for your vader. -- for your mayor. in all of your year, and i am really happy about that. for the past several days all of us have been focused on the storms that have taken place along the east coast, and obviously florida knows something about storms. as a nation we warn of those to of the losses. we-- we mourn those who have been lost. i talk to the governors and mayors every day. i want people to know what i talked to them i talking on behalf of america, and i have told them we will be with them every step of the way until they have fully recovered from the hardships and a crisis, and we will do it together, because that is how we do it in the united states of america. [applause] as heartbroken as we of the end result of the images of families who let that affect it, w
, there were two generators being used for the marathon to power the media tent. a third backup generator that wasn't being used. for more on this, joined by adam shapiro in staten island where he has been porting all day long, and editor-in-chief of runner's world which follows all of this. i will start with you, what has been the response from people you have been talking to all day long about this idea of having a marathon in the wake of sandy? >> people wanted it canceled. when it was announced it was being canceled i asked police officers what they felt about it and they responded in unison "good." now a girl we spoke to earlier, you got choked up, you're very emotional that the marathon would be run. what is your reaction? >> i am relieved. the right people are here taking care of what needs to be focused on witches for the city and staten island who is the unknn borough. >> since it isnown that was heard. the smallest voice was the largest today. what would you say to michael bloomberg about the decision to cancel? >> thank you. take care much because now the officials can pay atte
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)